The Dawat-e Islami IT team has done something incredible in putting together their Fatawa Rizwiyya Sharif application. Unfortunately, this team seems to be an all Microsoft shop. We’ll make dua for them on that.

Meanwhile, there seems to have been a slight oversight in releasing the software. Insha’ Allah we can get them to devote a few minutes of tawajjuh to this and rebuild the executable they distribute.

The problem is this: the app depends on [something related to] the Jet DB Engine, which is not only deprecated, but does not run natively under 64 bit versions of Windows. This does not mean that the software cannot run under 64-bit OSes, but rather the OS needs to know to run it app as a 32-bit app. Unfortunately Visual Studio compiles apps by default as platform agnostic, and 64-bit users receive an error. IIRC the error is something like “Microsoft.Jet.OleDb.4.0 provider is not registered on the local machine.”

While we wait for a fixed version, there is a fix you can perform locally. To change the 32-bit execution flag, just run:

CoreFlags.exe FatawaeRazaviya.exe /32BIT+

(Determining the full path for each of these executables is left as an exercise for the reader.)

CoreFlags is a part of the .NET SDK. If this is not already installed, download the latest version of the installer. (You can use the “for Windows 7” version on Vista – and it will probably correspond to the version of .NET you have installed.) In the installer, you only need to check: Developer Tools > Windows Development Tools > .NET Development Tools.

sdk_install

After changing this one flag, the app will work beautifully, assuming you have taken the necessary language setup steps.

Allah reward Ala Hazrat رضی اللہ عنہ and Hazrat Maulana Ilyas Qadiri and all of those working for Dawat-e Islami, and especially the programmers and ulama who have taken part in this effort a thousand times for every click of every user, and 100,000 times for every time someone acts on a point learned from a work prepared or question answered using this software.

I’m not really a Windows or .NET person, so if I’ve made any mistake in my explanation, forgive me and correct me.

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Worse than Who’s Who

November 19, 2009

The recently released report entitled “The 500 Most Influential Muslims” would barely be acceptable as an IB MYP Personal Project from a 10th Grader. I certainly hope that the people who did the actual work were undergrads and not doctoral candidates or – Hasha lillah! – Esposito and Kalin themselves.

Aside from my personal biases, the most jaw-grind-inducing problem was the sheer inconsistency. There was apparently no criterion for deciding how individuals were assigned to the various categories. This was really noticeable with religious scholars who were haphazardly assigned to three or four different categories. There was also no consistency in the amount of detail or the extension of meaning of terms used in the sidebar. National placement was also fluid – Shaikh Nuh Keller (US born, resident in Jordan for two decades) is listed under the USA, while Shaikh Gibreel Haddad (Lebanon born, US educated, longtime resident of Syria, and settled for about 5 years in Brunei) is listed under Brunei.

The “top 50” are ranked, and the rest simply listed by country and region in their categories. The most offensive category is that for “women.” All of the women included are shoved in this category, no matter what their field. Sheikh Hasina Wazed – the Prime Minister of a country with a population greater than those controlled by the four “most influential” combined is not only relegated to this category but even has her name mis-Arabized. (I suspect the editorial hand of John “qital=killing” Esposito there.) The only exception is Sheikha Munira Qubeysi (!!!?!!1!1!) who makes it as the token woman in the top 50. Read the rest of this entry »

French annulment

June 5, 2008

There’s a story which seems to have hopped over from the French blogosphere now making the rounds. Read the rest of this entry »

Turkish Schools Offer Pakistan a Gentler Vision of Islam – New York Times
Sabrina Tavernise is following in the grand tradition of NYT bureau chiefs reporting on Pakistan from the comfort of their home base in anywhere-but-Pakistan. In this case she at least had someone (Sebnem Arsu) who apparently spent some time in the country send her a quote or two rather than just regurgitating what the English press had to say. In this case, both the reporting and the analysis were uniquely shabby. Read the rest of this entry »

Rebel Sisters

May 1, 2008

I’m generally astounded that people manage to suggest with a straight face that what the Islamic world needs is its own Luther and its own Reformation. I usually assume it’s because they’re too busy listening to themselves to think about the difference between reform and Reformation. Ironically, they’re often the sort who elsewhere spew all sorts of bile on America’s most visible inheritors of the Reformation. So I was a little surprised to see someone who apparently is actually thinking about the fact that the Reformation is a Sixteenth Century-phenomenon, though one can only wonder what they imagine the Sixteenth Century to have been like – maybe they’ve been watching too much of the Tudors:

Clearly, this is a debate of importance not only to Muslims but to non-Muslims as well, and for a Westerner listening in, the best way to understand it may be to translate it into the language of European history. Irshad Manji sees herself as moving Islam into the 16th century; Ayaan Hirsi Ali wants to move it into the 18th. It’s as if Luther and Voltaire were living at the same time.

Personally, I feel it’s more apt to “translate it into the language of” American suburban adolescence. Hirsi Ali’s approach is typical of the average 14 year old ex-Catholic, while Manji’s more nuanced critique is that of the 19 year old Liberal Arts student. (These ages are calculated for the New York suburbs, add five years and a heavy dose of embarrassing awkwardness in the embrace of High School antics during college for those from the Heartland.)

BBC on Biswa

April 29, 2008

We could make this an annual feature – lousy reporting on the Tablighi Jama`at’s annual Bangladesh ijtima`.

The AP government is trying to spread awareness of a fatwa from Deoband condemning power theft. Read the rest of this entry »